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Wise Bar-B-Que Flavor Corn Chips (Big Lots)

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A word to the "wise": these are pretty good! I was craving a junky snack and perusing the Big Lots chip aisle when I came across a 5 oz. back of Wise BBQ Flavor Corn Chips retailing for just a buck.  After much mental debate as to whether or not I wanted to force-feed myself that much sodium for just a snack, I finally relented, and bought a bag.  The following are my thoughts on this particular product. I didn’t do a side-by-side taste test, but from what I recall, these taste pretty close to the national brand, which is to say that they’re incredibly salty with a slight barbecue tang in there somewhere.  In the realm of all things barbecue, these chips, like the main brand counterpart, are pretty bad; they only slightly resemble the titular condiment.  And yet they’re one of my favorite salty snacks (along with the equally mislabeled ‘Chili Cheese’ version, which tastes nothing like either chili or cheese and yet I can down a bag with minimal effort).  The textur

Wise Onion Flavored Rings (Big Lots)

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If you like this kind of snack, then you would be "wise" to pick up a bag! I love onion-ring flavored snack “chips”; growing up, the national brand was my favorite, but it was only an occasional treat because they cost so much.  I’m now 32, and the national brand is still an occasional treat, because they cost so much (come on, I’m not paying upwards of $4 for junk food).  Thankfully, as I’m learning, there are lots and lots of private labels eager to earn the business of hardworking folks like myself, and Wise is one of them. Wise is actually one of the more well-known brands that I review.  It isn’t a private label, and their foods can be found at a variety of places, from Big Lots, to Dollar Tree.  But while they may not officially meet the criteria for a “private label” brand, their much lower price points put them in a similar price bracket as the more inexpensive knockoffs. This particular onion ring avoids taking the “sweet” route, which we have seen from ot